Visit to Pooley Bridge

I woke up with a pawly paw. So it was decided that we would take it a bit easier after 30 odd miles pretty much uphill and down dale over the last few days. We chilled out at the cottage and then went for a short stroll around Goldrill Beck. This was great as I could let my paws recover a little from their recent exertions. After a while we decided it would be fun to go to the most northerly part of Ullswater, a place called Pooley Bridge. This was where the bridge washed away in the terrible floods earlier in 2016 and there is now a temporary bridge in place. When we got there, we parked and were soon off down the path to the lakeside to explore the area.
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There are some great views from the waters edge, but there were also billions of little midge things that were attacking everyone. We walked down by the water and it was great to see many people on sailing boats, yachts and kayaks all enjoying themselves. There is even the Ullswater Steamer which takes people (and sometimes furs!) from Glenridding to Howtown and Pooley Bridge, and back. We didn’t get to go on the Steamer, but maybe next time.
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In the evening we went to the pub, as we were all hungry and thirsty. They had some dinner and were sitting there just relaxing and enjoying the views from the windows over the Fells. I was asleep, thanks to my days on the Fells. When M&D were taking to some ladies from the USA and Canada who were undertaking the Coast to Coast Walk, I woke up. This walk is 192 miles and is a long way even for a fit and healthy Beagle Harrier. We were all very impressed as it was interesting to hear about their tribulations so far.
M&D didn’t know that I had arranged to meet Raffa Beagle and her M, who had come up for the following day and were planning on doing some zooms with us. When Raffa and her M arrived I was still sleeping but was awoken by a wet nose sticking through the balustrade. This was Raffa’s nose, in case you’re wondering.
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She is very nice and we woofed for a while. The nice White Lion pub landlady gave me a gravy bone, and offered the same to Raffa. She can’t have gravy bones as she has a special diet. Sadly I didn’t get her gravy bone. It got better as Raffa’s M gave me loads of tickles and belly rubs, so I was very happy to see them both. Having said that I did go back to sleep after the humans had been talking for quite a while. Raffa fell asleep too.  All the humans were very impressed with us being so calm and being able to sleep.
We parted late in the evening and I walked back to the cottage with excited ears, having arranged to meet on the following morning. I had met a new pal, she’s really nice and friendly and I hoped we would have a good day for walking in the hills.

Lake District adventures

Don’t say anything to my humans but I was quite tired when I woke up to another morning in the beautiful Lake District. Me & M went for a walk of about 3.5 miles and I saw a deer and squirrels. D went off for a run.We got back before him but he still looked very happy with his run. We had a couple of big walking days under our belts so didn’t go out until later in the morning. We were on holiday after all.
For some reason they decided to try and go to Ambleside and Grasmere on a bank holiday. I tried to warn them, but what can you do. We got there and both towns were packed out with people who all had the same idea as us. There was nowhere to park and we just drove around the towns, becoming more agitated. I tried to tell M&D that these people were there to see me, but they weren’t having any of it. It was thought best to return to Patterdale and consider the options. This was the view from Kirkstone Pass on the way back.
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When we got back we decided that it would be better to walk to Brotherswater which was a fairly straightforward stroll of 3 miles each way. It was a good walk as it was relatively flat. I met plenty of people and other furs on the walk and this was the view once we got there.
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There was a spaniel in the water, having a great time, but for some reason M&D thought I would run away if I went off lead. Would I?? Here in the Lakes?? We wandered down by the shoreline and then I decided it would be good fun to drag D up a really steep bank. Not sure he enjoyed it as much as I did.
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By the time we were on our way back I was getting more tired and even D noticed that I wasn’t pulling so much on the lead. But we went past a farm with some sheep and I got a second wind. He didn’t enjoy that either. But it was as much as I could do to flop onto my bed when I got back to the cottage.
When we went to the White Lion in the evening, I was recognised by the people behind the bar. I even got a tickle and a gravy bone. It’s always nice to know that my reputation precedes me. We had a table booked, apparently it’s so I couldn’t see other furs in the pub. I could see them, I could smell them but didn’t have the heart to tell M&D as they thought I couldn’t. To be honest I settled down really quickly until a very nice lady wanted a big kiss and tickle off me. How could I resist? She said she had lost her Jack Russell last year, so I tried to cheer her up a little.
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I also reminded all the other peeps in the pub that I was back – aroooo. I think everyone loves me. They all seemed to like me, I hope so as I’ve been working hard on my charm. Have I mentioned I was very tired. Another day in the Lakes had passed, I was loving this and wanted it to go on for ever.

Grisedale, Patterdale

Yesterday was exhausting, even for a fit and healthy Beagle Harrier like me. I let M&D sleep in a bit. It had rained overnight so everything was a bit more slippery when I went out with M for a quick walk in the morning. The clouds were still on top of the Fells and the sun hadn’t quite burned back the misty dew. It was still lovely. We couldn’t get to down next to Goldrill Beck as the rain from the previous night had raised the water level. We strolled about to stretch our legs, only to return to the cottage briefly. We weren’t back long before I swapped over my humans and went out with D whilst M relaxed in the cottage. We strolled a bit further than I had done for the morning walk and I could still feel the effects of my exertions from yesterday in my paws. It was nice to be out and about, and I even met some other furs. Everyone is so nice here, all the humans say hello and the furs have a friendly air about them.
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On  our walk, we saw they were setting up the cricket pitch so I made sure me and D had a wander around before heading off up a road we had never been on before. This wasn’t  surprising that I hadn’t been on this road, as I’ve only been here 1.5 days. I wanted to look over every drystone wall, climb every bank, look through every gate and smell every hedge possible. We wandered for ab couple of miles and then D thought we should return to see what M was up to.  When she found out where we had been, she said we should go back and see what it’s like further along the path as it sounded so good. So off we strolled, me in the lead as usual, showing my humans the way. I was so happy to see all the hills and rivers, and smell all the lovely smells, that we were off the tarmac and onto the rocky path before I knew it and going toward somewhere called Grisedale Tarn. A tarn is a small lake in the big Lakes.
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On our way we passed plenty of sheep, some cows and lots of people coming in the opposite direction. The people all seemed really nice again, and everyone commented on how handsome I was. Who am I to disagree. We went on for quite some time and the path was climbing closer to the misty clouds. This was another adventure, and it was great. I drank out of most of the becks on the way up and walked through most of the muddiest and boggiest parts of the path, after all I wanted to make sure I enjoyed the Lakeland experience as much as possible.  It started to get a bit steep and rocky so we decided that we would cross a bigger river and then descend on another path. I was leading the way as usual, my intrepidness coming to the fore.
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We came back down and strolled back past the sheep and cows again. I wasn’t allowed to say hello to them as they kept on running away. I was kept on a very tight lead by M, which was clearly for the best as the farmers are very strict on their livestock being hassled by naughty furs.
When we got back to Patterdale, I was allowed in the small post office and supermarket. The lady who owned the shop was really nice and gave me a biscuit. M&D were a bit worried as I had really dirty paws, but the lady in the shop just smiled and said I was handsome. The biscuit was very nommy too.
I was tired but I made sure I had enough energy for a short stroll to the pub, the White Lion. I had been in there briefly the night before and M&D were pleasantly surprised that I behaved impeccably and just went to sleep on my settle mat. There were a number of other dogs in there, and they all told me it was a nice pub with some dog biscuits behind the bar.
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This place is great but it makes me feel sleepy with all the walking, climbing, splashing about in muddy puddles and general Beagling I have to do. What would tomorrow hold, I would sleep on that thought.

My first holiday

I knew something wasn’t normal. I went out for an early walk and then had breakfast far earlier than usual. The car was loaded with some bags and I was put in my travel crate. We were soon on the motorway and heading north. I had no idea where we were going, but I knew it was a long way. The traffic got heavier and we got slower. I did wonder where we were going, and if we would get there. When we turned off the motorway, it was getting dark and I only just made out the sign that said “Welcome to the Lake District”.

I woke up early in the Lake District. I wondered if the hills and lakes would still be there, or was it all a dream? When I nosed around the curtains in the living room, I was so pleased that it was real. The hills must be high though, as they were draped in clouds which made me wonder more about them. Once we had been for a quick walk to the shop for some supplies and had breakfast, we were busying ourselves for the day ahead. I kept on checking to make sure the hills were still there, I couldn’t believe that I was actually here. I was harnessed up and then I knew it was time to explore this wonderland. We went across the beck which I think is what describes a small river. It looked more like a normal river to me. We went through gates and  then past drystone walls.

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I was allowed to stroll through mud and then stood in the water running off the fells. The paths were quite stony and we were going up hill and down hill. It was great fun. We stopped on a grassy knoll and the view was brilliant all the way back across Ullswater  to Glenridding.

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We kept strolling around the edge of Ullswater, and I even got to sniff in the ferns and the trees around the path. Sometimes the path went down quite steeply and I had to be good and walk to heel. This was quite difficult as I was really excited and I wanted to explore everywhere and everything. We seemed to go for miles and it was great. I still couldn’t believe I was here, on a holiday, in the Lake District. We kept on stopping to enjoy the views. Even I could appreciate them. I was getting tired but I still had excited ears. We were wandering back and we met a BT called Buster who was 13 years old. He said he had been here before, walked something called Striding Edge, but liked the lower paths now. He was really nice, we woofed for ages. We came off the hills after some considerable time and decided we would go to Glenridding for some quick noms for M&D. We wandered about and found a nice spot to eat a sausage roll. It should be noted that I got no sausage roll. We sat by Glenridding Beck, which sadly flooded in winter 2016 and caused a lot of damage to the town. We wandered down onto the edge of Ullswater and I went for a paddle.

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It was great, I loved the cool water on my paws and that it tasted nice too. There was a spaniel playing fetch the stick from the water. She was having great fun, she said I should try it. I explained that I’m not allowed off lead as I’m rubbish at recall and would run away.

We got back to the cottage and I fell asleep on my bed. Apparently I was twitching in my sleep and snoring quite a lot. I don’t know what they were talking about, I didn’t hear anything. My first day was great, I looked forward to the next day, and hoped it was as good.

My Garden

When I arrived in my new home, I had no idea that there was a wonderland of a garden attached to it. For the first few months I was shackled to one of my humans so couldn’t really enjoy it as much as I would have hoped. The number of trees made me suspicious that there were loads of little squirrels around. They would need chasing at some point.

I was allowed to roam fairly free after a couple of months, albeit on a long lead so I could at least chase a ball. I chased pigeons but they were pesky and kept on flying away. I think the squirrels were watching me and stayed out of my way. I could hear them, and sometimes see them, but they didn’t stray into my garden.IMG_0129

After a while I had calmed down enough to allow my humans to let me off the lead and to be trusted. It happened one day when I could hear them talking. I walked into the middle of the grass and sat down, the lead was unclipped from my harness and I just stood up and wandered off. I think this shocked all concerned. One thing I learned very quickly was that I could survey all the garden if I sat on the patio table.

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One day I wasn’t allowed in the garden as usual. I wanted to go and explore and play but I was being kept indoors. When I looked out again, there were many people in the garden and they were taking away 2 of my trees. Apparently the trees had a nasty disease which was eating them from the inside. They would have fallen over if they weren’t taken away.File 06-08-2016, 21 45 42

I have found many things in my garden, many of them are somewhat grisly and gruesome. One day, I was nosing about under one of the Yew tree and I was surprised to find a squirrel, but it wasn’t moving. Normally they like to run away from me but when I picked it up gently in my teeth, I saw it was headless so very dead. Another time there were two legs sticking out of the grass so I think the rest of the pigeon had been eaten. My human mum then found a ball of feathers and blood, so another pigeon had succumbed to the red kites who live in the area.

Now the only wildlife that I see in my garden is a tiger. Sadly I cuddled my tiger with my teeth and he doesn’t look like this any more.

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I love having freedom to run and play, I’m very lucky. Its safe for me. But I’m still waiting for the squirrels to dare to venture into my garden.

 

Dog Show

I went to a dog show on Saturday. It was organised by the rescue centre who looked after me before I arrived at my forever home. My humans thought it would be a good idea to try and get me more socialised around other dogs, as I tend to be quite exuberant and excitable sometimes when I first meet other dogs, or a situation is quite new to me.

So off we went to the dog show to try and continue my education and see if I can be calm around other dogs and people. It was a very warm day, which helped as I am slower in the heat, and don’t tend to pull as much on the harness. I enjoy car rides, despite my early encounter with a car when I was a pup. Seeing somewhere new, especially if there are hedgerows involved is always exciting for a Beagle Harrier. We arrived after it had started, which was probably the plan knowing these two humans I adopted. There were two main show rings, and plenty of other stalls with food, drink and toys to buy. It looked great fun. The first time we went around the stalls and spoke to people, I was very excited and wanted to woof with as many dogs as I could. You should understand that I hadn’t been socialised when I was a pup, so I missed out on my very important formative years. Because I can be over-exuberant some dogs take umbrage with me. I am getting better though, I approach with my tail wagging and I am always smiley. Anyway, we strolled around and I was having a great time. We watched the judging for one of the classes. I managed to sit still for all of three seconds.

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It was interesting as I met many different breeds and types of dog, most of whom were rescue. My humans were speaking to others who had also taken on rescues and I think it was reinforcing their view that we are worth it, we are hard work sometimes but the rewards are there for all to see in the end.

So, having wandered around and chatted to dogs and humans, I got some presents for later when I got home. The packets smelled of food but they were put away from my sight. I wasn’t entered into any classes as I thought it better to allow other dogs to win “Loudest Aroooo” or “Dog that can’t sit still for more than three seconds”.

I was calming down after 15-20 minutes, I even managed to lay down on the grass. It was very warm and there were plenty of water bowls. Eventually we found some shade, fortunately near to a hedgerow and I was allowed to sniff about.

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It was a good learning experience for me. I have improved so much since I arrived that, as I woofed in my last blog, I am apparently a different dog. It has taken some time to realise that I have to be gentler around other dogs. I can play, but I have to be a little more careful and see the signs if some dogs don’t like my bounciness.

Thank you to Chilterns Dog Rescue Society for organising the day, it was great and I enjoyed myself. I’m learning new things every day. This was an important step for me.

Different dog

Apparently I am a different dog? I’m not sure what they mean, as I look the same as the day I turned up, albeit slightly greyer around the whiskers. That’s called being distinguished I have heard it said.

When I arrived in late December 2013 I was a frightened, confused and bemused Beagle Harrier. Having been rehomed twice I wasn’t really certain if this latest house was to be my forever home. The humans looked quite nice, the house was more than adequate and the garden was like some magical playground which I wanted to explore immediately. However I had seen this before and for one reason or another, it hadn’t worked out. I was confused, I wanted to feel settled, to feel part of a family I suppose, but I didn’t have the mental stimulus or ability to know exactly what that entailed.

This was me, a couple of days after I arrived. The green fluff is all that remained of a toy I had “cuddled” with my teeth.

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I had no stability or regimentation to my life. I was looked after very well by my friends at Chilterns Dog Rescue Society and I had some basic training and command structure. But there was no routine to my day. I woke up, strolled about my kennel, ate my breakfast and then had a whizz around the fenced in play area. I strolled back to my kennel and lazed about in there until it was time for snoozing again. There were plenty of other dogs to play with but I was missing something. I was feeling lonely, I didn’t feel part of a pack, I didn’t have humans to look after. When these humans arrived to see me for the first time, they were told I was beginning to lose my “aroooo” as I was becoming quieter and somewhat more withdrawn. It was a fortnight after we first met, that they returned to pick me up and take me to, what I desperately hoped, was to be my forever home.

It was a struggle for quite some time for us all. We didn’t understand what we wanted of each other, and I could see that they were getting frustrated at the communication between us. I was taken on walks, went to the park, went to the woods, through some fields, even walked through the town centre. Pigeons are great to chase! I saw new places, smelt new scents and met different people and dogs. But there was still this nagging doubt in my mind, was this my home. Without realising it however days turned into weeks, then into months and on to two and a half years currently. Gradually I was getting a routine, I was walked around a certain time, I had breakfast at approximately the same time, I had to find my treats around the house around the same time each day. I was allowed to snooze, I could wander about the garden and sniff the scents whether it was rain, sunshine or snow. The walks  changed areas slightly as we tended to go to the woods or fields where I could let off some steam and be satisfied, both in mind and body. I was enjoying this much more as the days, weeks and months passed by. I was being trusted in the garden, not to run away, not to try and jump over the fence and not to dig holes. I managed two out of three, the hole digging remains particularly appealing. I was finally getting my routine, I knew what was coming. Gradual, subtle changes were taking place, so subtle that sometimes it took other people to point out what we didn’t realise. I am a happy dog, I am content and I have routine. I’ve got what I have been missing for a large part of my life.

This photograph was taken on Sunday 17th July 2016. Even I can see a change.

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I’m a different dog, I’m happy and content. I’ve got proud ears.