Trust and patience

Reverting to some of the thoughts I have had so far in my life with mum and dad, I want to touch on something that played on my mind early in my time here.

Ever since I arrived, I had been trying to work on the trust and stability aspects with my humans. For the first two and a half years of my life, I had been from pillar to post. I was looked after very well by the rescue centre. However my first time away from the rescue centre wasn’t what it should have been and there was no relationship of trust or stability being fostered with me. You may recall I had my accident with a car. There was an innate understanding of things I needed to remember and I knew there were guidelines and rules. However these weren’t really implemented for me so I just cruised along doing whatever I wanted to being honest. Beagles are somewhat difficult to train if you listen to some people. Harriers are slightly easier if you listen to the same people. Being a Beagle Harrier cross, this presented its fair share of difficulties for my humans. I am glad to say we have made huge strides in my life and understanding of where I stand now.

I was quite an independent hound when I first arrived. I didn’t think I had to rely on other people to get along, and I was fairly quiet and sometimes very stubborn. I didn’t know if this was my forever home, as I had been in at least one home before, along with the rescue centre on two occasions. Here I had a crate, I had beds, I had food, I had warmth and I had two people who seemed like they were really nice. However there was this overriding thought that would not go away. Was this it, my forever home, the stability that all furs need and crave in their lives to be happy. The early days were difficult to be honest. Everyone was trying to read everyone else’s moods, their reactions, their habits and ways of learning what to do next. For instance we had early visitors to my house, and they included young children so this, seemingly, was familiar territory for me. Whilst it only lasted a few hours, there was something different. I wasnt allowed to play as much as I had wanted to and I was being told to behave in a more controlled manner than I was used to. It appears that the little boy wasn’t sure around dogs so I couldn’t pounce and play.

How do I let them know. I love them.

From the start of my life here, the humans and I were trying to understand each other and almost train each other. I could say the atmosphere was sometimes fractious whilst we tried to work out exactly what we wanted from each other. However that would be a disservice to all concerned as there was more frustration than anything else. I had not had stability throughout my early life, I didn’t know if this was my final home, or whether I was moving on after another 6 months or so. The frustration from all of us manifested itself in all sorts of situations when things weren’t going to plan. For example when walks were turning into runs and arms were being pulled out of sockets. Initially I was on a lead and collar. It was very uncomfortable for me and I managed to make myself sick on at least one occasion. Moving on to a harness seemed like a good idea, until my independent streak kicked in when I escaped whilst in the park, and I was “free” for 3 hours. Another escape within a short time probably didn’t help the atmosphere of trust or bonding that was being sought. Cue a tighter fitting harness and I am safe now. At first I wasn’t allowed off lead in the garden, although a long training lead did start to feel a bit like freedom. 

We can work it out

Sub consciously the weeks turned into months and the gradual acceptance of belonging came more to the front of my mind. I had been here for longer than anywhere else, and these two humans were still here. They were walking me, feeding me and I was still allowed to laze in my numerous beds. The thought that this might be the forever home was gradually becoming more of a reality with every day that passed. They created something called a birthday for me, when I got some extra food and some toys. I wasn’t going to complain as I didn’t have to do anything different for it, so I just accepted what was offered. In any case all toys got shredded fairly quickly and were left around the house for people to step on. We think this shredding of toys was another manifestation of my frustration at not knowing if I was staying or going, indeed my lack of understanding or bonding with mum and dad.

My walks were becoming less frequent in number but longer in time. We explored so many paths, fields, woods, parks and byways that I was becoming calmer with my position in the house as some of the pent up frustration was being left outside on the walks.

For a while after I arrived, I didn’t realise what it meant to have tickles, belly rubs or back scratches. I would treat most signs of affection as a signal that something was going to happen. We are going for a walk, food was about to be given, or I was going back out into the garden for a wee I didn’t need. I never dreamed or understood at first that belly rubs, a good neck scroffle or just something as simple as a great big hug meant just that. It was a sign of affection.

In my happy place

If we were in the garden, I was on a lead and would take up the time of at least one of mum or dad who needed to supervise me. If we were outside the garden then I would sniff and wander where I wanted to. I would get pulled fairly sharply out of thickets or hedges and never really thought about why mum and dad didn’t want me to have thorns, brambles and stinging nettles in my face. I was doing what comes naturally to an independent Beagle Harrier without any stability. I didn’t know what trust was like, I could see that they were trying to work with me, but I couldn’t yet work out how I would trust them. My heart was saying that these are good people, but my head kept interrupting and asking whether this was it? Was this house forever, when was I moving again, where was I going and would these people be forever? Gradually the trust came to the fore, I realised that days and months came and went, I was being shown the structure that I had craved, that all dogs crave, to enjoy myself. To be able to lay there, on my back on a rug, having my belly rubbed and having my ears stroked, was something that I had clearly been unappreciative of. Also to understand that the belly rub was for free, and I wasn’t expected to do anything or go anywhere for it, was really a start toward recognition on my part that I could finally feel this was my home. I had found humans who wanted to look after me, look out for me and teach me the structure of life. I was being shown how to live, walk, run and bark at the top of my voice. But overall, I was being shown, that with trust we would be alright, I wasn’t going anywhere. I was staying here, with them. We were, and remain, a team.

It took time and patience however we all trust and understand one another far more now. I was given something that many people don’t fully appreciate is vital and that is time to understand and adjust. Rescues adapt at different paces and patience is essential.

Part of a team and it’s great

I’m still not allowed off lead outside the garden but thats another story which I am telling as I go along on my journey.

A question of quarantine

I saw this on a blog that I follow called https://flippersandflatwhites.blog – I have tried to give it a canine theme.

Is he contemplating biting me yet?

How are you attempting to maintain sanity – Keeping my routine of bitey face, walks, food and napping in some semblance of order.

Are you quarantining with anyone – My parents and my vampire beagle brother.

Show & tell: show off anything and everything you’ve made/accomplished during quarantine – I have made some blogs on my site and I am working on helping my brother settle and feel more loved.

Favourite quarantine advice – “Don’t be a fanny, stay away from your granny”.

Last fur you peemailed – My brother. He almost walked underneath me whilst I was leaving the message.

Last fur who peemailed you – My brother.

Who is the last fur you barked with – A spaniel cross who wanted to go along the path we had travelled.

What are you most excited to do when it’s all over – Go further afield and show Lenny more of the countryside around here. Its lovely.

Do you have any quarantine goals – Eat all the gravy bones my parents have bought.

Most consumed snack or food – Gravy bones, marrow bone biscuits.

What substances are you using/abusing? – Gravy bones.

What has been the worst part of quarantine? – Not being able to go too far outside our house on our walks.

What has been the best part of quarantine? – Spending time with Lenny in a calmer environment around the house and garden

What is the meaning of life – Live. Love. Leave.

If you could go anywhere right now where would you go? – In the middle of Trafalgar Square in London and arooooo all my buddies to come and join me.

What is your daily average nap time –  Too scared to contemplate.

Last thing your parents purchased for you – Food. Not enough but at least it was something.

What are your most used apps & websites? – Twitter and WordPress

Last song you listened to? – Inside of love by Nada Surf

Best movie or tv show you watched recently – The Dog Whisperer, The Dog Father, For the Love of Dogs

Whats the last game you played – Bitey face with Lenny, about 20 minutes ago

Last google search – Gravy bones, they’ve still not ordered them.

Last youtube video you watched? – Danny MacAskill.

What do you miss most about life before the pandemic? – Being able to go out a lot more.

What is something new you’ve tried or done during this time? – Training with and without treats. Recall in the garden has improved.

Are you reading anything good? – The Five by Hallie Rubenhold.

What are you grateful for today? – My brother, my parents, my friends and my health.

Where was the last place you’ve gone to that isn’t home? – Pednor on a walk this morning. We saw rabbits.

What is something new you’ve learned during quarantine? – I can be calmer and Lenny looks to me for guidance. And that he loves me.

Most absurd/ridiculous thing you’ve done during quarantine? – Chased my brother every day around the garden.

A fear? – This virus goes on and on and we cant go outside and explore.

A wish? – To see as many of my friends as possible as soon as we are allowed.

Does anyone you know have/had the virus? – No, thankfully. I want it to stay that way too.

The Cypriot Vampire

As Lenny has been here for a calendar year, I thought I would sit down with him in between bitey face and garden shenanigans to see what he’s made of the last twelve months of living in my house. So, grab a gravy bone or ten, fill your bowls with Adam’s Ale and hopefully enjoy our woofs.

Lenny. Lenny!! Over here, yes it’s me, Dex. Hello!! We are supposed to be catching up on your first year.

Oh hello Dex, what’s up brofur? Oops sorry, I’ll just stop eating this stick. Right I’m all yours, what do you want to know?

Good grief. Right, first question. When we first met in Jo’s house in Essex, did you have any idea what was going to happen next?

Erm no. Not a clue. I was happy to be in the UK and to be having walks every day and the chance to practice my bitey face skills with the other dogs at auntie Jo’s. I hadn’t been here long from Cyprus and I was getting used to all the different things. Then you showed up, we went for a walk and I got to woof with you whilst we strolled across the park. You seemed quite a nice fur.

Erm, thanks. Did you find it difficult to adjust when you arrived in the UK?

I don’t know. As I say I hadn’t been here that long, I was still getting used to things like lots of grass, all my new buddies in Essex, the climate and different food. To then be whisked away and deposited in your house was a strange moment. I had been on an aeroplane and in cars so I suppose I just thought it was another adventure. What an adventure it is though!

I hope I like it here.

So, when you got to my house what did you think?

Well I had met you the week before and to meet you again was a bonus. I remembered we had played in Essex and you were pretty good at snout jousting. We were allowed to go out into your garden straight away and we just chased each other. You were making a lot of noise in pursuit of me. I was happy as your garden is big so we had plenty of space. When Jo and Amelia left I didn’t really register what was happening as we were having so much fun. I suppose I didn’t realise they had gone. When it did dawn on me, I was a little bit worried as this was all very new and unfamiliar so I wasn’t wholly certain what was happening.

I think we will get on well.

Did you struggle with the language?

No, I understood your woofs quite quickly. There is a common language of Beagling so I had the basics already in place. It just took a while for me to fully understand these “commands” things we are supposed to respond to from the parents.

We spent quite a while in the first few weeks “playing”, did you feel that you were settling?

Not really. At first I think I was still trying to find my paws in this new house with you and our parents. It was all quite strange for me, and I don’t think I quite appreciated how much of an upheaval it was for you too. I didn’t know you were an only child before I arrived so I suppose I didn’t understand what effect my arrival would have on you and your life. I was waking up quite early and wanting to go out, I was trying out all your beds as well as mine and I didn’t quite comprehend that you eat from one bowl whilst I eat from another. Things like that really. I didn’t have any set routine but that came fairly quickly so I started to settle soon.

You know that our parents were concerned at us two going at each other for the first week, don’t you?

Indeed. I got the impression that they were struggling a little with our tendency to continually squabble throughout the day, even down to not being able to sleep on different sofas. I suspect that the first elongated session of bitey face after a week did us the world of good though as I was whacked out after that. I think it was about two hours chasing each other around the garden and the parents were looking at one another grimacing with fear and trying to suppress the urge to step in. We just stood there panting and grinning at one another.

However I also think one of the seminal moments in the first week was when I had an accident in the house. I was worried that I was in big trouble but it was all just cleaned up and life went on. I think I even got some ear scratches. I could see that we would all get along ok after you and I had got our squabbles out of the way.

We got better eventually though, once you started to settle down.

Yes, we do get on better now, although we still do excellent bitey face games in the house and garden. I like learning from you, it’s fun. I’m quicker, but you have all the shortcuts worked out.

Hmm, anyway, moving swiftly on. What did you make of the short series of training sessions you went to?

I thought it was good, an excellent way to teach Dad how to feed me treats for a little effort on my part. As you had woofed, he is a pushover when it comes to sit, stay, lay down and wait. And the frankfurter treats were very welcome. I was with a group of other pups and I think I was the oldest. It was interesting to see what was required of me. I hope dad doesn’t read this bit about being easy to persuade on the treats front! We continued our training on the patio and in the garden at home so I think I got something out of it and now I am much better. Apparently I still need work on my recall outside, as they want to let me off in some places.

I have no idea where those places are, as the outside is full of scents, squirrels, rabbits and foxes. Oh and deer too.

This is true, and I wouldn’t mind being let off in the woods to be honest. Having woofed that, I suspect I wouldn’t be seen again for quite some time.

You didn’t like the car when you first got to ride in it?

No, I am afraid I felt really ill and got car sick. I went to see a nanny and when we arrived dad saw I wasn’t feeling great. Unfortunately he didn’t quite manage to get me out of the travel crate quickly enough and I was a bit ill. Again though it was all cleaned up without fuss. It was just about ok when I was going to training class as the journey was about 20 minutes but, when I saw nanny, we went round this motorway thing and it was quite a long journey. I enjoyed myself at nanny’s flat though. I don’t think dad was looking forward to the return but I managed to hold it all in on the way back. Mum and dad worked it out that it was the peripheral vision that was causing me problems so they sorted that out. Also I now travel with you in the car and we can while away the time playing cards, drinking beer, playing video games and watching sports. Oops I meant to say we just make sure each other is happy and then we go to sleep.

Well, you were certainly better when we all went to the Beagle World Record Reunion in September 2019 in Macclesfield near Manchester.

Indeed, I had got used to the car by that time and I was travelling with you so we were, erm, able to sleep and just not worry about anything. That was a great day, I loved every minute of it. I couldn’t believe my ears and eyes when we arrived and there were over 600 beagles. I just wanted to get out and about and meet as many of them as possible. Great day and I was completely whacked out when we were coming home.

Hello Raffa, I’m Lenny. Pleased to meet you.

Indeed, we met many friends that day.

We did. I had the honour of meeting Raffa, Griff, Boot, Daisy, Dolly, Ruby and even Tink and Tyrrell’s mums who were over secretly from Australia amongst many others. I know you had told me that I needed to be on my best behaviour when I met Beagle Twitter royalty that day. I tried my best. Meeting so many friends was just wonderful, I loved every minute of the day. And I especially liked that I could walk mum around the world record course, that you had done with dad the previous year. I was proud ears to be amongst illustrious world record breaking company. And you were there, of course (ouch!!)

We started to do more trips out in the car so you could get better at travelling.

Oh yes, I remember we went to Wendover Woods and then to Ashridge Common on consecutive weekends. They were brilliant as I was able to scent creatures and see so many things, I was tired before I got back to the car. It was also fun as dad decided we should go to the brewery on the way back from Ashridge so “everyone was a winner”.

Then we went to visit our other nan and grandad, and ran around their house like a couple of loons. They had those stairs that we weren’t supposed to use but our bitey face game was made all the better when you stood at the top of the stairs arooing at me. It was a shame we were only there for the day really. However it was a fun day. We went out for little day trips after that, so I suppose I got more used to it. Now I’m good at it although I don’t like the jumping into the boot and settling down bit.

The longer you were here, the more we tried to show you the different areas we can walk in.

We did. I liked one walk in particular, when we went through the woods, into and through three fields, down a byway and then circumnavigated a really big field to retrace our steps. That was fun, and full of new scents.

Botley field.

Ah, you mean Botley.

Probably. We went in a big circle and then came back via small paths over the top of the hill. Actually I like the walk around Pednor, the walk to Mayhall Farm and the one up to Chalfont as well. I think what I am woofing is that I like all my walks. It was good in the summer as it wasn’t too hot and we could walk in the shade of the trees as well as in the open fields.

I introduced you to the London Underground. What did you think when you first saw the tube train?

I was excited ears. I hadn’t come across one of these things before and to travel on one was fun. I remember we walked through the woods and lanes to that Chalfont place and then rode the tube back home. At first I didn’t know what to think, but as soon as it started moving it was fun. I was allowed to sit on mums lap as well and I could see the countryside passing by so that was a bonus. We went on the tube a few more times and you woofed to me that usually that meant something was in the offing for the future.

Tickets please!

And I was right. The trip to London to meet Raffa.

Aw what a day. I was a bit worried when we only went out for a really short walk. And it was quite early when we had our breakfast so I thought I would be hungry. Walking up the hill to the train station, you woofed that this normally meant we were getting a longer trip so would be going on an overground train. When the train arrived I thought it would be like the tube, but it was much faster and I wasn’t allowed to sit on mum or dads lap. We arrived in London and my eyes were trying to take in all the sights and smells. You woofed it would be smelly air and it certainly was. We went through that Regents Park and then met Raffa at the train station. We went on tubes, walked streets, through markets, passed monuments, saw Towers, crossed bridges, woofed at people, saw sailing ships, crossed wobbly bridges, marvelled at cathedrals, went to the pub, waved at the Queens house and then took a black cab ride back to the train station. I even saw a big wheel covered in lights next to the river. No wonder we slept like logs on the return journey. I was so tired I could hardly put one paw in front of the other for a few days.

The boys are back in town

Indeed. Then we went and did it all again!

Of course, we met with Lucy’s mum and dad and we strolled around part of London again. Dad was trying to show them parts of London that people may not usually see. And I remember the Police lady on the horse was laughing at you as as you were arooing loudly near that Bank of England. It was reverberating through the streets.

Yes well, we can gloss over those small details about the Mounted Police lady.

We had a great time and I was quite sad when we woofed cheerio to Lucy’s parents at the Tower of London. Again though we slept all the way home and my paws were aching. Fun times. I hope we get to do that sort of trip again, hopefully with some other pals and buddies. I like exploring and there are so many places I want to go and see. Off lead would be good, but I suppose I will have to make do with being attached to a human for a while.

Christmas arrived.

Oh you mean that time when the little green tree was put up and we received gifts without needing to obey commands? It was fun. We even got that turkey in our dinners for a few days after. We still went on walks, and the frost was on the ground. I’m not sure where this snow stuff was that you promised me? I was a bit disappointed to be honest ears as you woofed that I was going to be allowed to taste this yellow snow delicacy.

Ahem cough cough, yes well. You’ve been here a year. What are you looking forward to the most in the coming months and years?

I am looking forward to getting out and about and being able to meet new pals and play bitey face with them, without the threat of being arrested and put into dog prison for breaking the rules on being outside. This virus isn’t very nice to be honest ears and I wish it would go away. However, that means that humans have to behave themselves and listen to what they are told. If one of our parents is anything to go by, he doesn’t usually listen to anyone so we could be stuck with it for a while. He is being sensible about this virus though. I am looking forward to summer walks and paddling in the river to cool off. I want to go in the car and visit pals. I want to see new places and smell new scents. And if I can do all this with you, then I will be a happy beagle. Once this virus is beaten, we can do all sorts of exploring, visiting and shenanigans with our pals.

And what have you most enjoyed over the last year?

Ooh, good question. The snout jousting with you, as well as waking dad up by standing on him when he’s being lazy and trying to snooze around six am. I have enjoyed running around the garden listening to you arooo at the top of your voice. The walks through the fields and woods are great, travelling on the train and tube is fun and meeting pals on my walks is exciting. Being here though I think is the best. I have a solid routine with treats, walks, tickles, training, beds and love. Much love. I suppose I landed on my paws really when I got here. I had no idea what was going on when I got onto the big aeroplane in Cyprus and then found myself on the other side of Europe within hours. I’m glad you let me live here and I am pleased we are brofurs. I have enjoyed meeting pals and visiting exciting places like London. I have also enjoyed contacting many friends through our Twitter account. It’s good to see friends from all over the world and woof with them, especially when you are asleep. We’re like a big family and look after one another through good times and bad.

One last question, and then you can go back to chewing your stick. If you could do one thing in the next year what would you like to do?

Hmm, I think I would like to have a massive party with pals in this Lake District place you woof about. I have seen the pictures and it looks like beagle paradise so thats what I would like to do. Oh, and I would like to bring back all pals who have gone over the Rainbow Bridge. They all sound really good fun and I would love to meet them all. I know that’s two things, but I am a beagle and can’t count.

Cheers Lenny, that was fun. Enjoy chewing your stick. Hang on, what do you mean woofing with my pals when I’m asleep!!

Oh, erm, nothing Dex. Love you mate.

Lucky Lenny

As a final comment from me, it is lovely to have Lenny here. I know we always have fun at each others expense but I feel like we have made great strides to living well together and, to be honest, I wouldn’t be without him now. We look out for each other and I enjoy showing him the places to go and what it is like to have a strong and stable life. I’m glad he’s my brother.

Surprise!

I am lucky as I have a large number of friends on Twitter. In fact it is difficult sometimes for mum and dad to keep up with all the tweets. My friends and I all have fun together, look after each other and give each other a shoulder to cry on, or paw of comfort, when needs must. It’s nice sometimes as we feel like a big family and we know that, despite not meeting the vast majority of those friends, we hope we can still count on each other as pals.

I had already met Raffa, one of my best pals, when I was on holiday in the Lakes. This was in my previous blog. She was so nice and friendly, and even made me blush when we nose bumped to say good bye. We had great fun. I then heard from another pal, Charley, that there was a large gathering due to take place before Christmas 2016. I gave my humans those eyes that only dogs can give and a plan was hatched with Charley and, his brofur, Boot. They told me the annual gathering was somewhere near Sheffield. When people were there, baubles were hung on a special tree to commemorate those furs we have loved and lost over the years. Charley’s mum said it would be fun if we could go along and to keep it a surprise for the other furs, all of whom I woof with regularly. It is quite a long journey for us so we thought about it, and I continued to give mum and dad the “eyes” to persuade them. We said we would try to come along and agreed it would be a surprise for everyone else who was there.

Fortunately the weather was set fair for the particular day so we set off very early in the morning to try and get there on time. The sad thing is that we had just lost another pal who had gone over the Rainbow Bridge in the week prior to meeting up so we knew that it might be a bit emotional.

Having arrived 5 minutes late, we strolled nonchalantly towards all my my pals who were being readied for the stroll around the reservoir. I am afraid I might have given the game away by arooing rather noisily. Charley’s mum wondered aloud “Oh, there seems to be another Beagle here, I wonder who this could be?” Everyone seemed quite happy to see us, and we were happy to see the rest of my pals and their humans. We think it was a nice surprise, we certainly hoped so. Auntie Sarah, who had lost her sweet beagle Boo the week before the tweetup, got leaky eyes when she saw me. She also told me that my messages for her were lovely and had helped her with her heartbreak. I managed to give her leg leans to reassure her that what I had tweeted was a true story. I did have to woof to her to stop giving me tickles and making me feel sad and get leaky eyes as well. Did she not realise I had a rufty tufty image to maintain here. 

Wait for me, Nut and Oggy!

I got to meet Eddy, Tean, Nut, Oggy, Raffa, Charley and Boot. We all walked along woofing at each other, and enjoying all the sniffs and scenery in this lovely part of the countryside. The humans were chattering away too. I found out that Oggy is a rescue beagle from a laboratory in Hungary so he was very scared of many things. This was bad and I had leaky eyes when I walked next to him. We all tried to look after him as much as possible. At one point there were some motorbikes which were going to whizz past, and he had to be picked up and shielded from the noise and smell. I had worried ears for him, but auntie Sarah cuddled him so tight to protect him. However the further we walked, the calmer he seemed to be and we had a good woof as we wandered around, up hill and down dale. We unfortunately missed meeting Bryher, who is Teans sister, as she wasn’t very well and had to stay home. Eddy is a good lad too, bigger than me and pulls on the harness as much as I do. We woofed about life in general. Raffa was in her chariot for most of the walk, as she had damaged her cruciate ligament and was being told to rest up and be safe. Dad got the honour of pushing her chariot again for a while, just like in the Lakes. Charley and Boot strolled along taking in the scenery. I found out that they live in the countryside so they are used to having lovely views and scenery. We got to the tree, people hung their Christmas baubles and had their quiet thoughts to themselves and we continued our walk around the reservoir. It was a lovely place and we chatted for a long time.

We all ended up at a cafe and the humans had cakes and buns and coffee. Apparently it was a bit cold for some of them, and I must say mum did look a bit blue and frozen. Then the final surprise was that I got some cards and presents from my friends which was very nice, and very unexpected. I didn’t have anything to give them in return and I had guilty ears about this. But they woofed that, because I had come a really long way to see them, they would forgive me. I knew immediately that these were good friends and would be friends forever.

Dad drove home and I slept for most of the way, even when the trucks and coaches were driving so close behind us, that I could read their number plates.

What a great day, what great friends. I had so much fun I wanted to do it all over again. I would have to sleep on it though.

Zzzz, why a great day that was.

First holiday

I have been telling many (read ALL) of my friends and pals that I have never had a holiday. We furs sometimes call them holibobs but I had never been on one. Indeed I had been sent to prison a couple of times whilst they went off enjoying themselves in Edinburgh and London, and I didn’t like it at all. You might have noticed my distaste for kennels from the previous chapter.

As such when, one evening, I saw my parents packing a bag I felt a bit depressed to be honest as I thought I was going to prison again. Then some of my toys and dinner foods went into my toy crate, and this gave me suspicious ears. I had heard them talk previously of somewhere called “Morgan’s Place”. They had been there before and thought I might like it. I didn’t connect in my mind what this meant for a second. I knew of a Morgan through my Twitter pals. He lived somewhere that sounded really lovely. That night I slept wondering what mum and dad were talking to each other about. I had no idea I would be getting a holiday. A real, actual holiday.

The next day, dad was still there in the morning. This gave me suspicious ears as he usually went to school on the smelly tube to London. The bags packed the previous night were still there, and my toy crate was also still full of my food, blankets and some toys. My deeply suspicious ears only worsened when dad said he was taking me out for a walk to “try and get some zooms out of my system”. We went to the park, the hill and through the town. It was great as I get to try and pull dad about but he’s strong and I end up being quite tired. Little did I know this was all part of their masterplan. When we got back home, the bags were put into the car and then I went into my travel crate in the boot of the car. Now I travel well but I hadn’t really been anywhere further than a couple of hours away in the car with mum and dad. We went on something called a motorway and it was really interesting to see the scenery go by. We stopped so I could stretch my legs after a while and then continued. As we got further away from my home, the other cars and lorries on this motorway got more and more and we were in something called a “traffic jam”. This made mum and dad pfftt and harrumph quite a lot. I just stayed out of the way in my crate enjoying this new experience. We stopped twice more as it was a really long journey and we arrived later than expected in a place called Patterdale in the Lake District. It suddenly dawned on me that this  is where Morgan lives, with his mum and dad and they have a really nice holibob cottage that I’ve been allowed to stay in. I didn’t meet Morgan when we arrived, as his mum said he can be a bit grumpy and I’m quite bouncy. I don’t believe he’s grumpy, but I did hear him growl and bark the first evening. He sounds quite big. 

Once the bags had been unpacked and my beds put down on the living room floor, dad took me for a quick stroll. My eyes could not believe the sights I saw. There were hills as big as mountains, sheep the size of, well, sheep, so many green trees, beautiful rivers, big fields, lovely hills and lakes. This was beyond my dreams, I was somewhere I couldn’t comprehend and my brain was tired just trying to process it all. I decided I would have to sleep on all this. Mum and dad were hungry and wanted to go to the pub. This worried them as they really hoped I wouldn’t aroo and mess about in there, and get kicked out as a hooligan dog. So we entered the White Lion with much trepidation. Dad asked if it was ok for me to come in, and was told of course, that’s not a problem. Phew, first hurdle over. Settle mat down, but I was too tired to mess about too much with the other furs that were in there at the time. It was great fun seeing new places and new things. Even when I arooed there were lots of people saying “what a cute dog?”. Clearly I have to work on my rufty tufty image a little more.  I tried to think more on this whilst I slept.

First day of holiday.

I woke up early in the Lake District. I wondered if the hills and lakes would still be there, or was it all a dream? When I nosed around the curtains in the living room, I was so pleased that it was real. The hills must be high though, as they were draped in clouds which made me wonder more about them. Once mum and dad had bothered to get out of bed, we went for a quick walk to the shop for some supplies and then had breakfast. I kept on checking to make sure the hills were still there, I couldn’t believe that I was actually here.

After breakfast, I was harnessed up again so I knew it was time to explore this wonderland. We went across the beck which I think is what describes a small river. It looked more like a normal river to me. We went through gates and  then past drystone walls. I was allowed to stroll through mud and then stood in the water running off the fells. The paths were quite stony and we were going up and down hill. It was great fun. We stopped on a grassy knoll and the view was brilliant all the way back across Ullswater  to Glenridding.

I might be happy to be here

We kept strolling around the edge of Ullswater, and I even got to sniff in the ferns and the trees around the path. Sometimes the path went down quite steeply and I had to be good and walk to heel. This was quite difficult as I was really excited and I wanted to explore everywhere and everything. We seemed to go for miles and it was great. I still couldn’t believe I was here. On a holiday! In the Lake District! We kept on stopping to enjoy the views. Even I could appreciate them.

Wow. Just wow!

I was getting tired but I still had excited ears. As we were wandering back we met a BT called Buster who was 13 years old. He said he had been here before, walked something called Striding Edge, but liked the lower paths now. He was really nice, we woofed for ages. We came off the hills after some considerable time and decided we would go to Glenridding for some quick noms for mum and dad. We wandered about and found a nice spot to eat a sausage roll. It should be noted that I got no sausage roll. We sat by Glenridding Beck, which sadly flooded in winter 2016 and caused a lot of damage to the town. We wandered down onto the edge of Ullswater and I went for a paddle. It was great, I loved the cool water on my paws and that it tasted nice too. There was a spaniel playing fetch the stick from the water. She was having great fun, she said I should try it. I explained that I’m not allowed off lead as I’m rubbish at recall and would run away. 

We got back to the cottage and I fell asleep on my bed. Apparently I was twitching in my sleep and snoring quite a lot. I don’t know what mum and dad were talking about, I didn’t hear anything.

Grisedale.

Yesterday was so exhausting, even for a fit and healthy Beagle Harrier like me, that I let mum and dad sleep in a bit. It rained overnight so everything was a bit more slippery when I went out with mum for a quick walk. We couldn’t get to the little shale area of Goldrill Beck as it was under the water from last night. We wandered about a bit and then we weren’t back long before I was swapped over and I went out with dad whilst mum pottered around in the cottage. We wandered a bit further than the morning and I could still feel the effects of my exertions from yesterday in my paws. It was nice to be out and about and I even met some other furs. Everyone is so nice here, all the humans say hello and the furs have a sniff of each other. 

They were setting up the cricket pitch so I made sure dad and I had a snooter around before heading off up a road we had never been on before. This isn’t surprising as I’d only been here 1.5 days. I wanted to look over every drystone wall, climb every bank, look through every gate and smell every hedge possible. We wandered for about 2 miles and then dad thought we should return to see what mum was up to.  When she found out where we had been, I think she had jealous ears as she said we should go back and see what it’s like further along the path. So off we strolled, me in the lead as usual, showing mum and dad the way. I was so happy to see all the hills and rivers and smell all the lovely scents. Then we were off the tarmac and onto the rocky path before I knew it and going toward somewhere called Grisedale Tarn. A tarn is a small lake in the big Lakes. We wandered past loads of sheep, some cows and lots of people coming in the opposite direction. They all seemed really nice again, and everyone commented on how handsome I was. We went on for ages and the path was getting closer to the misty clouds. This was another adventure, and it was great. I drank out of most of the becks on the way up and walked through most of the muddiest and boggiest parts of the path. I wanted to make sure I enjoyed the Lakeland experience as much as possible.  It started to get a bit steep and rocky so we decided that we would cross a bigger river and then descend on another path. I was leading the way as usual, my intrepidness coming to the fore. We came back down and strolled back past the sheep and cows again. I wasn’t allowed to say hello to them as they kept on running away. I was kept on a very tight lead by mum, which was clearly for the best. When we got back to Patterdale, I was allowed in the little village shop and the lady was really nice and gave me a biscuit. Mum and dad were a bit worried as I had really dirty paws, but the lady in the shop just smiled and said I was handsome. The biscuit was very nommy too.

 I was tired, this place is great but it makes me feel sleepy with all the walking, climbing, splashing about in muddy puddles and general Beagling I have to do. 

Ambleside & Grasmere

Don’t say anything to mum and dad but I was still quite tired this morning. Mum and I went for a walk of about 3.5 miles and I saw a deer and squirrels. Dad went off for a run, and we got back before him but he still looked very happy with what he’s done. We had a couple of big walking days so didn’t go out until later in the morning. For some reason my parents decided to try and go to Ambleside and Grasmere on a Bank Holiday. I tried to warn them, but what can you do. We got there and both towns were packed out. I tried to tell mum and dad that maybe these people were there to see me, but they weren’t having any of it.

Kirkstone Pass

When we got back to the cottage we decided that it would be better to walk to Brotherswater which was a fairly straightforward stroll of 3 miles each way. It was great, I met loads of people and other furs, but I wasn’t allowed to play “fetch the stick from the water” – again. There was a lady spaniel there and she was having a great time, but for some reason mum and dad thought I would run away. Would I?? Here in the Lakes?? We wandered down by the shoreline and then I decided it would be good fun to drag dad up a really steep bank. Not sure he enjoyed it as much as I did.

Brotherswater

By the time we were on our way back I was getting more tired and even dad noticed that I wasn’t pulling so much on the lead. But we went past a farm with some sheep and I got a second wind. He didn’t enjoy that either. But it was as much as I could do to flop onto my bed when I got back to the cottage. 

When we went to the White Lion in the evening, I was recognised by the people behind the bar. I even got a tickle and a gravy bone. It’s always nice to know that my reputation precedes me. We had a table booked, apparently it’s so I can’t see other furs in the pub. I can see them, I can smell them but don’t have the heart to tell mum and dad as they think I can’t. To be honest I settled down really quickly until a very nice lady called Paula wanted a big snog off me. How could I resist her. She said she had lost her JRT last year, so it was clearly my job to show her that she needs another fur for company. I also reminded all the other peeps in the pub that I was back – aroooo. I think everyone loves me. They all seemed to like me, I hope so as I’ve been working hard on my charm. Have I mentioned I was very tired. 

Pooley Bridge

I woke up with a pawly paw. So it was decided that we would take it a bit easier after 30 odd miles pretty much uphill and down dale in the previous few days. We chilled out for a while and then decided it would be fun to go to the most northerly part of Patterdale, a place called Pooley Bridge. This was where the bridge washed away in the terrible floods earlier in 2016 and there is now a temporary bridge there. When we got there, we parked quickly and were soon on our paws to the lakeside to explore the area. There are some great views from the waters edge, but there were also billions of little midge things that were attacking everyone. We wandered around the edge of the water and they took some photos with the boats on the water. It was very nice to see the area from a different place, but there were loads of midges. 

Pooley Bridge pupster

In the evening we went to the pub, as we were all hungry and they wanted a drink. They had some dinner and we were sitting there chitter chattering (I was sleeping!!). What I didn’t know was that they had arranged to meet Raffa Beagle and her mum who had come up for the following day and were planning on doing some zooms with us. Before Raffa and her mum arrived, my mum and dad were talking to some ladies about something called the Coast to Coast walk of about 192 miles. This is quite a long way, even for a Beagle Harrier, so it was interesting to listen to them, in between me trying to sleep. When Raffa and her mum arrived I was still sleeping. I was awoken by a wet nose sticking through the balustrade. This was Raffa, in case you’re wondering. Raffa is very nice and her mum gave me loads of tickles and belly rubs, so I was very happy to see them both.

The lovely Raffa Beagle

Having said that I did go back to sleep after they had been talking for quite a while and so did Raffa.  All the humans were very impressed with us being so calm and being able to sleep.

Grisedale walks with Raffa

We woke up and I knew that something different was on the cards. Mum and dad were fussing about and making sure I was ready to go. We met up with Raffa and her mum outside the pub and I greeted Raffa with an arooo and a nose bump. She seems quite nice. There was much chattering whilst we wandered along. Raffa and I sniffed and arooed at each other as we had never met before. I found out that she had a pawly leg from a week ago, so I was more gentle than usual when I meet another fur. I’m usually quite boisterous and like to jump and play. When Raffa said her shoulder was bad, I thought I should be gentlemanly. 

We went up the Grisedale valley and I showed Raffa all the sheep and cows that I had seen a couple of days before. She was quite impressed and the views up toward Helvellyn were really great. We sniffed about on the grass and when the sheep were too near we arooed in unison to move them away. Teamwork all the way. We even managed to get one sheep that leapt over Raffa and her mum, when it felt a little penned in by a gate. We were arooing so much at one point that the farmers came out of their house to see what all the kerfuffle was. Fortunately we were both on very tight leads so we couldn’t get anywhere near the sheep. We didn’t chase them, just arooed at them. I don’t think the sheep wanted to play anyway.  We seemed to walk for ages, and the humans were chattering to each other. Raffa & I just patrolled and sniffed about in the long grass. Raffa also nommed some sheep do-do’s which was horrible but apparently she said its quite tasty. I didn’t believe her so I decided against this little delicacy. We were quite a way up the path and Raffa told me she was getting tired so we turned round and wandered back. Raffa had a ride in her chariot so that she didn’t injure her shoulder any more, which wouldn’t have been good. My dad even helped push her chariot, I suppose thats what humans are there for really.

We went to the boat house coffee place near Glenridding for the humans to have coffee and buns, and Raffa had some lunch and I ate biscuit noms. It was really nice as there were loads of other people there, as well as many furs coming and going. The nice ladies in the the coffee place even put out the awning when it started raining. Raffa had a sleep as she had woofed she was a bit tired. Whilst Raffa wasn’t looking, I thought it would be a good idea to remind Raffa’s mum that she had promised me belly rubs and tickles.

Once they had been administered, I went back to my mum to give me more tickles as well. I managed to sit on her lap to watch the world go by. It was great, apart from the rain, and the views are brilliant. I wanted to stay but Raffa had to go home, so we wandered back slowly along the road. I thought it would be polite to give Raff another nose bump which she gave back. I did blush a little, as my rufty tufty image was being dismantled. We are pals, which is good as I like being friends with other furs, especially Beagles. We said our farewells so that Raffa and her mum could go home again. I had a great time with them.

Once Raffa & her mum had left to go home, I had sad ears but I knew I had a new friend for life. Actually I had 2 new friends as I think Auntie J quite liked me. She certainly liked my arooing ability. We went to the White Lion and I got more gravy bones from the landlady. And Paula, the nice lady who wanted snogs earlier in the week was there, so I had more tickles and belly rubs to help me sleep more soundly.

Keswick

I still had a bit of a pawly paw, so after our early morning strolls around Goldrill Beck and Side Farm, we relaxed for a while before we all got in the car to go somewhere I had never been before. We drove alongside Ullswater and then took a fast road to a place called Portinscale, which is near Keswick. Mum and dad decided that we could take a walk through the woods and paths near the quieter side of Derwentwater. We went through the woods and along streams and trails toward a hill called Catbells. I couldn’t see any cats, and I certainly couldn’t hear any bells. I wonder who gives the hills their names? We didn’t climb the hill as I was getting quite a few scents and was pulling on the lead and harnesses. I have two bungee leads and a harness so I can sniff and wander around somewhat. We skirted round the edges of Catbells for a while and then strolled back along the road toward Keswick. It was at this point that I became quite agitated. It was only when mum & dad saw about a thousand grouse in the fields and road that they realised why my behaviour changed so quickly. Once we got back to Portinscale, the grouse were a distant memory and I was back to walking somewhat nicely. When we arrived in Keswick, it was market day. There were so many people there, that we were a bit worried that it might be a bit much for me. There were an awful lot of furs there, but I was a really good boy and many people complemented me on my good behaviour. I kept on looking in all the push chairs or strollers for Raffa, but she wasn’t there. I was disappointed as I wanted to walk with her again. I even nose bumped a small human child who was in the stroller. I think they enjoyed it!

Whilst we were in Keswick we went to the Dog Shop which sells plenty of things for us furry friends. We didn’t buy anything, as apparently I have everything I could want, but mum managed to step in ice cream on the pavement. She wasn’t very happy. Keswick is great as nearly every shop is dog friendly, which means we can go in and explore most places.

When we got back to the house we recuperated and then went to the White Lion for our last evening in the pub. We had our normal table so I could survey everyone coming and going. Not that it mattered much as I spent 99% of my time sleeping like a good boy. Sometimes when the door opened I looked up expecting Raffa to wander in with her mum.

Is that Raffa? Oh, ok.

She didn’t. I had sad ears as I was beginning to realise that this was my last night in the Lakes and Raffa had gone home. I managed to get one last tickle and snog from Paula who was also going home the next day. And, of course, a gravy bone was duly provided and scoffed with glee. My last night in lovely Patterdale was great, we really enjoyed it all. I wanted to stay. 

The next morning we had to go home. So we packed all of our things into the car and headed south, down the motorway and back home to my house. I have been on a wonderful holiday to a beautiful place and met a great new pal. I am a very lucky Beagle Harrier.

Porridge

Continuing in the vein of telling some of my story thus far, I arrive at one of my most trustworthy subjects for sympathy, the total and utter lack of holidays in the first couple of years I was living here.

I regularly point out to a number of pals that I hardly ever go for a holiday. If truth be known, I actually complain at anyone who will listen to me. My humans had been away a couple of times and I was put into kennels, which I call jail. How they couldn’t take me with them, I will never know.

The first time I was forced to go to jail was about 6 months after I arrived. They decided they were going off gallivanting to Edinburgh in May 2014 and couldn’t take me. So they devised a plot and told me I was going to a dog hotel and spa for a few days. It all sounded lovely. When I arrived at the kennels I was allowed off lead and ran around like a Beagle Harrier possessed. It was freedom on a massive scale as the enclosed field was about 2 acres. I was in my element and didn’t really notice that mum and dad had gone. It was only when the kennel people wanted me back in my cell (sorry my kennel), and I steadfastly refused to return, that I started to wonder. So the kennel people left my food in my bowl and I just played for the rest of the day, wandering dolefully back later to have the kennel door clang shut behind me. It only really occurred to me that mum and dad weren’t there when I woke up the next day and was still in my cell. I had my bed and a toy but I kind of missed the tickles and affection that I was becoming used to when I woke up at home. The only upside was that I met other furs and I got to run around quite a bit during the day. Ok thats 2 “upsides” but I am a beagle harrier and counting isn’t a strong point. Especially when it comes to biscuits as I can never have too many. I enjoyed being able to run around off lead and having the wind in my ears. However I was feeling a bit lonely to be honest. There was another beagle in a cell near me, and she told me that she had been there for about a month and was getting used to it. I didn’t want to be there that long, so I was hoping that mum and dad would be back soon.

When they eventually returned four days later (yes FOUR days!) I don’t think mum recognised me. I was sitting at the front of my cell, apologies again, my kennel, with my ears over my eyes looking very forlorn. I had seen them walk through the gate and knew I had to play the guilt card. Dad saw me and quickened his pace so I could go home with them. The guilt trip continued for a while longer, I have to admit, as I moped about when I arrived back home and didn’t really speak to them both for a day or so. I was very pleased ears to be back home but I tried to make sure that mum and dad knew I didn’t like kennels much.

Then they only went and did it again the following year. Dad was running in something called the London Marathon and he had been training hard through the winter. We went out in the car one day in April 2015 and I thought this was going to be a nice day out, that we would get a walk. Life would fine and dandy. How wrong could I possibly be? It was only when we arrived and I was out onto the driveway of the kennels that I realised that something was afoot. And it got worse as the kennel people remembered me from before and asked if I was the same dog who spent all my time running around instead of eating and sleeping like the other furs. They still let me run free when I got there, but this time I was keeping my eye on mum and dad. I was tricked though as they managed to leave without me knowing. Just because I was investigating a particularly interesting corner of the paddock, didn’t mean they could sneak away. Not in my book anyway. The jail people also had orders to walk me on the lead throughout my stay, which was very dull.

Dick Beardsley and Inge Simonsen (Joint winners of the first London Marathon in 1981)

Mum and dad returned after 2 days and this time I knew the guilt trip wouldn’t work. I couldn’t wait to get in the car and get home. When we did get back, I just raced around the garden, arooooing at the top of my voice and then leapt on all the furniture I could find. Within an hour I was asleep. They seemed pleased to see me again.

I hoped my prison days were over, and this was my home now. I was still waiting for my holiday though. I was more determined than ever now to not let them out of my sight when trips away were mentioned. I wanted some of the fun they were having.

On the trail of sniffs

As I have become better behaved in the garden, or my grounds, I have also been allowed out on longer walks. I have to stay on the lead though when I am outside the garden. We go out on walks through the fields and woods near where I live, and the smells that fill my nose are wondrous and plentiful. Often we will mix up the walks with different places and if the weather is a bit naughty, we might go into the woods for quite a long time, rather than wandering around the fields getting really wet.

Stay close and don’t woof anything.

Now, as a Beagle Harrier, my nose plays quite an important part of my general day to day life. I tend to get on trails and then follow them mercilessly. This makes walks through the fields and woods somewhat more of a trail scent hunt and my nose barely leaves the ground. For mum and dad it can mean that one arm is longer than the other, as I tend to pull quite a lot when I want to go in the hedgerows and verges. This is where all the small creatures live and I think I have introduced my parents to many creatures that they didnt know lived in copses, woods and hedgerows. As we have said before, when we first started on outside walks, I pulled on the lead immediately after leaving the house. We live near quite a busy road and the humans were scared I was going to do something stupid. I haven’t, but thats not to say I haven’t tried. Once I was running with my dad who was training for one of his marathon races, and I tried to dart out into the road. He wasn’t very pleased with me, and told me off. I probably deserved it, but there was something interesting there apart from the front of the approaching car. I seemed not to have learned anything, as the following week I was running with dad and he wanted me to run in a straight line. Now, there wasn’t much chance of this happening and I was suddenly distracted by a critter in the hedgerow. Sadly for dad I ran across his path and he had to leap over the lead to avoid falling over. We got back and he said he couldn’t go running with me, as I couldn’t concentrate and was always darting around.  Apparently this was dangerous as he needs to run in a straight line, whilst I need to be sniffing hedgerows. This is what I do. I had sad ears, as I enjoyed running with him. I had quite a bit of freedom. It was fun.

So, I went back to being walked around the fields and woods, which is always fun and very interesting.  When we left the house you will recall that I was being trained to walk to heel close to the main road. I was gradually getting better at walking well. Mum was getting cleverer every day, she was working out where I was pulling and where I was walking better. We were walking at heel much more often. This was ok for a time but my senses regularly overtook my ability to walk nicely and to heel so I fairly often relapsed into trying to get somewhere faster than necessary.

I have walked my pawrents for thousands of miles whilst I have lived here. I think I have walked, pulled or run over most of the paths, parks, fields and woods within 5-6 miles radius of my house. This allows my senses to be filled with sights and sounds. We deliberately walk in different places so we get a different perspective and we don’t get bored. I think they realised quite soon that I would need walking in all weathers which is great for me. We get really muddy, wet and dirty, I get to stroll through puddles, hedges, rivers and sniff around through woods. In the summer we get to walk through the parched fields, as well as cool off in the river on the return home. One of the best bits is walking through the fields of wheat as there are many critters living in there. Being a careful and fleet footed Beagle Harrier I don’t damage the crops, allowing them to bend as I breeze past.

Come on out Mr Rabbit.

Its great fun living here, and I am very lucky to be able to have lots of places to roam and pull my pawrents around.