Return to Jeffrey Johnson’s pubs

As many of my friends and followers will remember, I saw a blog a while ago on Spitalfieldslife.com relating to some old pubs photographed by a gentleman called Jeffrey Johnson. As a result in April 2019 I sent my dad off to London to investigate if the pubs were still present and, if not, find out what is there in its place.

There were a number of extra photographs in the collection held at the Bishopsgate Institute which hadn’t been published. So we decided it was about time dad was allowed another day off and we packed him off to stroll through the streets of London. Thirteen miles of walking later, this is his report on a number of pubs and other buildings some of which appear to have ceased any existence and others which have changed their use.

All the original photographs taken from the 1960’s – 1980’s are the property of Jeffrey Johnson. All the new photographs are the property of me, @rescuedogdexter.

Wheatsheaf, Stoney Street, London Bridge

The pub was rebuilt in 1840. It was given Grade II listing in 1998 and then closed temporarily in 2009 for four years whilst the top storey was removed to allow another railway bridge to be placed directly above. Sadly the pub was caught up in the London Bridge attack in 2017.

Fullers pub, Monument

For a Fullers pub, there appears to have been a dearth of information on it. We believe it was called the Monument and was present until shortly after 1987. It was redeveloped as offices, a bar and Boots the Chemist amongst other stores.

Mappin & Webb, Bank Junction

The old Mappin & Webb building was designed in 1870 by a gentleman called John Belcher. It had listed status. Despite such protection, it was demolished in 1993 to make way for One Poultry which was completed in 1997. The building stands on the corner of Queen Victoria Street and Cheapside. It houses offices and, at one time, a rooftop bar.

St Ethelburga’s Church, Bishopsgate

First recorded in 1250 as St Adelburga the virgin, the church was rebuilt around 1411. At some time during the 16th century it had a wooden porch placed over the entrance to house 2 shops in order that the church could raise more money. The church was extensively damaged in 1993 when an IRA bomb was placed around 30 feet from the entrance and caused major damage to Bishopsgate. It was rebuilt in its original manner after a public outcry over plans for the building to be removed and altered significantly. The church is Grade I listed. It is now a Centre for Reconciliation and Peace.

Magpie & Punchbowl, 86 Bishopsgate

A short distance along Bishopsgate from St Ethelburga’s was situated the Magpie & Punchbowl. It occupied a corner plot with one of the old alleyways prevalent in London through history, being Clarks Place leading to Wrestlers Court. This hostelry was another victim to the IRA bomb which devastated Bishopsgate in 1993. It was rebuilt and incorporated into an office block. However this was also subsequently demolished and is now part of the 100 Bishopsgate office project.

Aldgate office block

Aldgate is a ward in The City of London. It is bounded on the east by the line of the former London Wall, part of which remains and can be seen in an office just out of view in the photographs. The area bounded by Aldgate (the street itself) and Duke’s Place is now pedestrianised. The office itself is somewhat of a mystery regarding who owned it, or who was housed within.

The Rising Sun, Tower Bridge Approach

The Rising Sun appears to have been located in the Tower Hill, Mansell Street and Shorter Street triangle. The address was 12 Royal Mint Street, which is to the left of the old photograph. Due to the building of an office it was not possible to obtain a similar view to the original photograph, however the view toward Tower Bridge and St Katharine’s Way is clearly shown. The pub was closed in 1969 but was still present to be photographed in 1977.

Old Red Lion, 24-29 Whitechapel High Street, E1

Situated next to one of the entrances to Aldgate East Underground station, the Old Red Lion was built around 1835 and demolished in 1983. The older picture shows the pub between the Underground entrance and Lloyds Bank, and the P&O London office of Beagle House rising ominously to the rear. Now it is all swept away, with Aldgate Tower standing on the site. The entrance to Aldgate East remains (remodelled) on the right side of the latest photograph.

Christ Church Spitalfields E1

The church hasn’t changed since the original photograph was taken. However the surrounding area has altered significantly. The London Wool Exchange, in the row of buildings to the right of the church in the first picture, is now a glass office block with only a facade of the old brick frontage remaining. Spitalfields Market to the left of the pictures now houses a number of boutique shops and restaurants along with a market.

Turks Head, 308 Brick Lane E1

Located at the northern end of Brick Lane a pub has existed on the site since approximately 1790. Originally addressed as 1 Turk Street before Brick Lane was extended. The pub was still open in 1968 and demolished sometime thereafter. The location of the pub on Turk Street appears to be on the corner of Virginia Road and Chambord Street.

Manchester Arms, 155 Hackney Road E2

A pub was on the site sometime prior to 1872. It had a name change in 1991 and was subsequently closed in 1994. It became retail premises and has been a ladies hairdresser, a taxi office and currently is a barbershop.

The Sporting Life, Wilmot Street, E2

Located close to Bethnal Green Overground station, a pub has been present since before 1792. The pub was originally called the Lamb. Its name was changed in later years to The Sporting Life. It was closed in 1993 and converted to residential use.

Hat & Feathers 2 Clerkenwell Road EC1M

A pub has been open on this site between 1782 and 1990, then closed for around 17 years and reopened between 2007 and 2011. It is now closed again and there seems to be no sign of any re-opening. A former Taylor Walker pub.

Princess of Wales 1 Bridport Place, N1

This was a difficult pub to locate due to the lack of information available from the initial picture. There are a number of pubs called Princess of Wales. The pub was bombed in 1944 during WWII and was completely demolished. Left derelict for a considerable period of time, housing now occupies the site.

Blue Coat Boy 415 City Road, EC1

The pub was known as the Blue Angel at the time of its demolition in 1990. Offices now occupy the space, with a home-brew pub called the Brewhouse & Kitchen on the ground floor.

Kings Arms, Gard Street, off Moreland Street EC1

A Banks & Taylor pub. Appears to have been opened around 1810 and closed in 1974. Subsequently demolished to make way for flats.

Cannon Brewery 160 St John Street, EC1

Founded in 1720 by Rivers Dickinson, John Dickinson & Richard Dickinson. Two of them were then declared bankrupts in 1817. It changed hands a number of times more. In 1863 it was owned by George Hanbury & Barclay Field. It became a Registered Company in 1895 with 110 public houses allied to the brewery. The business was acquired by Taylor Walker in 1930 and became Ind Coope (London) Ltd in 1960.

The White Horse 90 Fetter Lane EC4

A pub was present by 1766 and known in the early years as the Oxford House as it was the starting point for the stage coaches heading for Oxford. It was rebuilt in the style of the first photograph around 1899 and subsequently closed and then demolished in 1989. An office was built in its place, which was again demolished and replaced by the office seen in the latest picture.

The Globe, 1 Hosier Lane, Little Britain EC1A

Locating this pub was interesting. It is shown as No.7 Hosier Lane, however records show it as No.1 Hosier Lane. The building believed to currently occupy the site is shown as No.23 Hosier Lane. Located to the south of Smithfield Market, the former Charringtons pub had been open between 1869 – 1961.

Old King Lud 12 Ludgate Circus

The pub was built in 1870, purchased by Isaac Levy in 1894 and became part of the Chef & Brewer chain of pubs, selling Whitbread beer. A couple of closures followed for refurbishments until it was closed permanently in 2005 and turned into mixed use office and cafe.

Baynard Castle, 148 Queen Victoria Street EC4

On the corner of Queen Victoria Street and St Andrew’s Hill just south of St Pauls Cathedral, the pub was renamed Cos Bar in 2006 and is now a bar and restaurant called Rudds Bar.

We hope you enjoyed our walk through some of the lesser known parts of London. Sadly too many of the establishments have disappeared from sight, however their presence is maintained through the photographic records.